ARTISTIC DREAM OF A MUSE
ARTISTIC DREAM OF A MUSE

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 24” x 36”

“Nothing happens unless first a dream.” ~ Carl Sandburg

I never dream in pastels. 

I never dream in black-and-white. 

I dream in vivid Technicolor. 

And then I translate them to Canvas. 

That’s when my dreams come alive.

STOP BULLYING
STOP BULLYING

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 24” x 36”

FASHIONISTA
FASHIONISTA

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 35” x 40”

“Africa! A place of heaven. A place of dainty nature. Yet not in saintly features. There are ingenious and gifted Homo Sapiens. Emanates from nowhere. Animals and green plants. Emerging from somewhere.” ~ Solomon Bright Dankwa

MARDI GRAS MASK
MARDI GRAS MASK

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 24” x 36”

“Nothing happens unless first a dream.” ~ Carl Sandburg

I never dream in pastels. I never dream in black-and-white. I dream in vivid Technicolor. 

And then I translate them to Canvas. 

That’s when my dreams come alive.

JAZZ MAN
JAZZ MAN

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 24” x 36”

ZEBRA
ZEBRA

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 36” x 24”

“I asked the Zebra, are you black with white stripes? Or white with black stripes? And the zebra asked me, Are you good with bad habits?Or are you bad with good habits?Are you noisy with quiet times? Or are you quiet with noisy times? Are you happy with some sad days? Or are you sad with some happy days? Are you neat with some sloppy ways? Or are you sloppy with some neat ways? And on and on and on and on and on he went.I’ll never ask a zebra about stripes...again.” ~ Shel Silverstein

MEXICAN SOUVENIRS
MEXICAN SOUVENIRS

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 36” x 24”

Mexican color explores the historical and contemporary use of color in the country where virtually every environment - in the home, in public places, and in natural settings - is rich with vibrant explosions of color.

“ROBIN” HUMOR ME
“ROBIN” HUMOR ME

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 30” x 40”

ROBIN WILLIAMS 1951 - August 2014 - Forever 

The Improv King from Mork to Good Will Hunting, Mrs. Doubtfire, Good Morning Viet Nam, Dead Poets Society, Birdcage and Patch Adams. 

He came through loud and clear to your heart. A Niagra of wit Robin was an unscripted Rhyming Tour de Force. 

A lightening Storm of Comic Genius and our laughter was the thunder that sustained him. Robin didn’t entertain an audience he pulverized it.

MEXICAN ODALESQUE
MEXICAN ODALESQUE

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 36” x 24”

THEY CALLED US “FLY GIRLS”
THEY CALLED US “FLY GIRLS”

Veteran:  Margaret Phelan Taylor, WWII Aviator
Artist / Writer:  Gayle Gleckler
When other girls were playing with dolls, I was playing with trucks and airplanes. Growing up in the middle of nowhere, Iowa, life was boring. Ready for adventure at 19, I spied a Life Magazine cover: Female Pilots. I wanted that. 
My dear father gave me $500, (a fortune back then) for me to train to become a pilot. Arriving in Sweetwater, Texas, shorter than the 5‘2” requirement, I just stood on my tiptoes. Not short on gumption, I was accepted.
They called us WASP: Women Air Force Service Pilots. It was a dangerous job. Once I was ferrying an aircraft cross-country and saw smoke in the cockpit. The parachute issued to me, was made for a man. The force of air and speed would rip everything off and I would slip right out. 
This was was a defining moment in my life, I thought, I'm not going to jump until I see flames. I made the right decision because it turned out to be a burned out instrument.
But 38 WASP pilots weren't as lucky. They died serving our country.
In 1942, the country was faced with a severe shortage of pilots. The commanding general of the U.S. Air Force, said he wasn’t sure whether 'a slip of a girl' could fight the controls of a B-17. 
He was so wrong. We flew everything including the B-26 and B-29 bombers. We expected to become part of the U.S. military. Instead our program was canceled after just two years. 
The war was ending in 1944. Flight training programs closed. Men who feared being drafted, lobbied for jobs, and took ours. It was unacceptable to have women replacing men. I couldn’t get another job as a pilot. 
In 1976 For the first time, women were admitted into the Air Force flying program. 
The WASP knew that was a terrible lie. We were first. In 1977 the WASP finally were granted military status. 
Only 300 of my original 1,100 WASP are still alive to receive the Congressional Gold medal. It’s been 65 years since my service, but I will forever be grateful for the opportunity to have served my country.
Everybody was off to war and I didn’t want to be left behind. I wanted to experience our country's fight. 
But more importantly, I was born to fly.

“JOAN” HUMOR ME
“JOAN” HUMOR ME

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 30” x 40”

JOAN RIVERS 1933 - September 2014 - Forever 

Can We Talk? I succeed by saying what everyone else is thinking. 

After many facelifts and everything lifts she still admitted, “My body is dropping so fast my gynecologist has to wear a hard hat” 

Knock Down - Stand Up Comic 

The best thing about old age is I don’t give a damn about what people think. And the Magic is who can possibly stop thinking of her and her cutting edge wit?

VIETNAMESE WOMAN ROWER
VIETNAMESE WOMAN ROWER

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 36” x 24”

LLAMA OF PERU
LLAMA OF PERU
BOTSWANA BEAUTY
BOTSWANA BEAUTY

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 30” x 30”

MURSI WOMAN WARRIOR
MURSI WOMAN WARRIOR

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 35” x 40”

MEXICAN BANDALARA
MEXICAN BANDALARA

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 24” x 36”

ROUMANIAN ROYALTY
ROUMANIAN ROYALTY

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 24” x 36”

ROSIE THE RIVETER
ROSIE THE RIVETER

Veteran: Rosie the Riveter
Artist / Writer: Gayle Gleckler

America had not yet overcome the Great Depression when it entered World War II. Good work was hard to find particularly for minorities and women.

In the six months following the attack on Pearl Harbor, roughly 750,000 women sought well paid jobs in defense plants. Only about one in ten was accepted.

Americans were fighting on two fronts, and there were not enough able-bodied men to meet the needs of both the armed forces and booming war industries. Employers who once thought women were too delicate for tasks like welding and riveting found them well suited for such work and faced a new challenge-attracting women to jobs considered unfeminine.

The character “Rosie the Riveter” in 1942 popularized the hit song by Ben Linder leader Kay Kaiser, became an icon and inspired depictions of strong working women like this poster. When asked why even more women did not join the workforce, one woman who knew what it was like to raise a family responded: “Because they don’t have wives.”

CHINA KING
CHINA KING
GOOD MORNING VIETNAM
GOOD MORNING VIETNAM

Veteran: Adrian Cronauer
Artist / Writer: Gayle Gleckler 

Adrian Cronauer's voice first rang out at twelve at the Pittsburgh Children's Amateur Hour. And so it began.

At the University of Pittsburgh he founded the college radio station WPTS. He needed only eleven credit hours to graduate, when the draft pressed him. He picked the Air Force. Passed a battery of tests to fly, but the Air Force chose him for broadcast, where stateside he recorded mind-numbing training films. 

Transferred to broadcast in Greece, he discovered his moxie, and added style to the pea-green military broad-casting universe. 

With one year left to serve, Cronauer had another choice; South Korea or Vietnam? He chose Vietnam and arrived shortly before the Gulf of Tonkin incident, which changedthe whole scope of the American effort.

His voice rang out again in a Saigon based show, ”Dawn Busters”, which initiated a whole new style. More like stateside radio, with innovation, enthusiasm and humor, it allowed the troop’s imagination to rise. Cronauer gave the frightened isolated American soldiers some hope to wake up to every morning.

He pushed for reforms. The military forces tried to silence him, giving him resistance. They preferred uninspired broadcasts without incentive or motivation, that didn’t make waves. Cronauer gave an unusual perspective to the confused American public too and something to consider. 

In Vietnam he did interviews with the troops in the field. One of the reactions he got from them was total frustration. They would be in hot pursuit of an enemy unit and have to disengage because they would cross over some invisible barrier or border. They’d be sitting there receiving incoming fire and not permitted to return fire or even load their weapons, without permission from headquarters.

His voice rang out again. With a Vietnam Vet, Ben Moses, he wrote a screenplay in 1979 and sold the rights to Hollywood in 1982.

"Good Morning Vietnam”, was directed by Barry Levinson, a real ADvet (Advertising Vet). He directed many award-winning commercials before he migrated to Hollywood. Casting Robin Williams in his breakout performance was so brilliant, the proof-most of Robin's radio broadcasts in the movie were improvised. 

Levinson didn’t want Cronauer and Williams to meet before the production because Williams was so fantastic at impersonation, he wanted him to have his own take on the character. So the two never met until the film's premiere.

Williams won Best Actor at the Golden Globes and was nominated for Best Actor at the Academy Awards.

Adrian Cronauer.

Your Voice Has Been Heard. 

IN PLANE VIEW
IN PLANE VIEW
FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE
FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE
ARTISTIC DREAM OF A MUSE
STOP BULLYING
FASHIONISTA
MARDI GRAS MASK
JAZZ MAN
ZEBRA
MEXICAN SOUVENIRS
“ROBIN” HUMOR ME
MEXICAN ODALESQUE
THEY CALLED US “FLY GIRLS”
“JOAN” HUMOR ME
VIETNAMESE WOMAN ROWER
LLAMA OF PERU
BOTSWANA BEAUTY
MURSI WOMAN WARRIOR
MEXICAN BANDALARA
ROUMANIAN ROYALTY
ROSIE THE RIVETER
CHINA KING
GOOD MORNING VIETNAM
IN PLANE VIEW
FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE
ARTISTIC DREAM OF A MUSE

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 24” x 36”

“Nothing happens unless first a dream.” ~ Carl Sandburg

I never dream in pastels. 

I never dream in black-and-white. 

I dream in vivid Technicolor. 

And then I translate them to Canvas. 

That’s when my dreams come alive.

STOP BULLYING

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 24” x 36”

FASHIONISTA

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 35” x 40”

“Africa! A place of heaven. A place of dainty nature. Yet not in saintly features. There are ingenious and gifted Homo Sapiens. Emanates from nowhere. Animals and green plants. Emerging from somewhere.” ~ Solomon Bright Dankwa

MARDI GRAS MASK

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 24” x 36”

“Nothing happens unless first a dream.” ~ Carl Sandburg

I never dream in pastels. I never dream in black-and-white. I dream in vivid Technicolor. 

And then I translate them to Canvas. 

That’s when my dreams come alive.

JAZZ MAN

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 24” x 36”

ZEBRA

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 36” x 24”

“I asked the Zebra, are you black with white stripes? Or white with black stripes? And the zebra asked me, Are you good with bad habits?Or are you bad with good habits?Are you noisy with quiet times? Or are you quiet with noisy times? Are you happy with some sad days? Or are you sad with some happy days? Are you neat with some sloppy ways? Or are you sloppy with some neat ways? And on and on and on and on and on he went.I’ll never ask a zebra about stripes...again.” ~ Shel Silverstein

MEXICAN SOUVENIRS

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 36” x 24”

Mexican color explores the historical and contemporary use of color in the country where virtually every environment - in the home, in public places, and in natural settings - is rich with vibrant explosions of color.

“ROBIN” HUMOR ME

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 30” x 40”

ROBIN WILLIAMS 1951 - August 2014 - Forever 

The Improv King from Mork to Good Will Hunting, Mrs. Doubtfire, Good Morning Viet Nam, Dead Poets Society, Birdcage and Patch Adams. 

He came through loud and clear to your heart. A Niagra of wit Robin was an unscripted Rhyming Tour de Force. 

A lightening Storm of Comic Genius and our laughter was the thunder that sustained him. Robin didn’t entertain an audience he pulverized it.

MEXICAN ODALESQUE

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 36” x 24”

THEY CALLED US “FLY GIRLS”

Veteran:  Margaret Phelan Taylor, WWII Aviator
Artist / Writer:  Gayle Gleckler
When other girls were playing with dolls, I was playing with trucks and airplanes. Growing up in the middle of nowhere, Iowa, life was boring. Ready for adventure at 19, I spied a Life Magazine cover: Female Pilots. I wanted that. 
My dear father gave me $500, (a fortune back then) for me to train to become a pilot. Arriving in Sweetwater, Texas, shorter than the 5‘2” requirement, I just stood on my tiptoes. Not short on gumption, I was accepted.
They called us WASP: Women Air Force Service Pilots. It was a dangerous job. Once I was ferrying an aircraft cross-country and saw smoke in the cockpit. The parachute issued to me, was made for a man. The force of air and speed would rip everything off and I would slip right out. 
This was was a defining moment in my life, I thought, I'm not going to jump until I see flames. I made the right decision because it turned out to be a burned out instrument.
But 38 WASP pilots weren't as lucky. They died serving our country.
In 1942, the country was faced with a severe shortage of pilots. The commanding general of the U.S. Air Force, said he wasn’t sure whether 'a slip of a girl' could fight the controls of a B-17. 
He was so wrong. We flew everything including the B-26 and B-29 bombers. We expected to become part of the U.S. military. Instead our program was canceled after just two years. 
The war was ending in 1944. Flight training programs closed. Men who feared being drafted, lobbied for jobs, and took ours. It was unacceptable to have women replacing men. I couldn’t get another job as a pilot. 
In 1976 For the first time, women were admitted into the Air Force flying program. 
The WASP knew that was a terrible lie. We were first. In 1977 the WASP finally were granted military status. 
Only 300 of my original 1,100 WASP are still alive to receive the Congressional Gold medal. It’s been 65 years since my service, but I will forever be grateful for the opportunity to have served my country.
Everybody was off to war and I didn’t want to be left behind. I wanted to experience our country's fight. 
But more importantly, I was born to fly.

“JOAN” HUMOR ME

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 30” x 40”

JOAN RIVERS 1933 - September 2014 - Forever 

Can We Talk? I succeed by saying what everyone else is thinking. 

After many facelifts and everything lifts she still admitted, “My body is dropping so fast my gynecologist has to wear a hard hat” 

Knock Down - Stand Up Comic 

The best thing about old age is I don’t give a damn about what people think. And the Magic is who can possibly stop thinking of her and her cutting edge wit?

VIETNAMESE WOMAN ROWER

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 36” x 24”

LLAMA OF PERU
BOTSWANA BEAUTY

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 30” x 30”

MURSI WOMAN WARRIOR

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 35” x 40”

MEXICAN BANDALARA

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 24” x 36”

ROUMANIAN ROYALTY

ARTIST: Gayle Gleckler

MEDIUM: Acrylic

DIMENSIONS: 24” x 36”

ROSIE THE RIVETER

Veteran: Rosie the Riveter
Artist / Writer: Gayle Gleckler

America had not yet overcome the Great Depression when it entered World War II. Good work was hard to find particularly for minorities and women.

In the six months following the attack on Pearl Harbor, roughly 750,000 women sought well paid jobs in defense plants. Only about one in ten was accepted.

Americans were fighting on two fronts, and there were not enough able-bodied men to meet the needs of both the armed forces and booming war industries. Employers who once thought women were too delicate for tasks like welding and riveting found them well suited for such work and faced a new challenge-attracting women to jobs considered unfeminine.

The character “Rosie the Riveter” in 1942 popularized the hit song by Ben Linder leader Kay Kaiser, became an icon and inspired depictions of strong working women like this poster. When asked why even more women did not join the workforce, one woman who knew what it was like to raise a family responded: “Because they don’t have wives.”

CHINA KING
GOOD MORNING VIETNAM

Veteran: Adrian Cronauer
Artist / Writer: Gayle Gleckler 

Adrian Cronauer's voice first rang out at twelve at the Pittsburgh Children's Amateur Hour. And so it began.

At the University of Pittsburgh he founded the college radio station WPTS. He needed only eleven credit hours to graduate, when the draft pressed him. He picked the Air Force. Passed a battery of tests to fly, but the Air Force chose him for broadcast, where stateside he recorded mind-numbing training films. 

Transferred to broadcast in Greece, he discovered his moxie, and added style to the pea-green military broad-casting universe. 

With one year left to serve, Cronauer had another choice; South Korea or Vietnam? He chose Vietnam and arrived shortly before the Gulf of Tonkin incident, which changedthe whole scope of the American effort.

His voice rang out again in a Saigon based show, ”Dawn Busters”, which initiated a whole new style. More like stateside radio, with innovation, enthusiasm and humor, it allowed the troop’s imagination to rise. Cronauer gave the frightened isolated American soldiers some hope to wake up to every morning.

He pushed for reforms. The military forces tried to silence him, giving him resistance. They preferred uninspired broadcasts without incentive or motivation, that didn’t make waves. Cronauer gave an unusual perspective to the confused American public too and something to consider. 

In Vietnam he did interviews with the troops in the field. One of the reactions he got from them was total frustration. They would be in hot pursuit of an enemy unit and have to disengage because they would cross over some invisible barrier or border. They’d be sitting there receiving incoming fire and not permitted to return fire or even load their weapons, without permission from headquarters.

His voice rang out again. With a Vietnam Vet, Ben Moses, he wrote a screenplay in 1979 and sold the rights to Hollywood in 1982.

"Good Morning Vietnam”, was directed by Barry Levinson, a real ADvet (Advertising Vet). He directed many award-winning commercials before he migrated to Hollywood. Casting Robin Williams in his breakout performance was so brilliant, the proof-most of Robin's radio broadcasts in the movie were improvised. 

Levinson didn’t want Cronauer and Williams to meet before the production because Williams was so fantastic at impersonation, he wanted him to have his own take on the character. So the two never met until the film's premiere.

Williams won Best Actor at the Golden Globes and was nominated for Best Actor at the Academy Awards.

Adrian Cronauer.

Your Voice Has Been Heard. 

IN PLANE VIEW
FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE
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